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Effects of three antecedents of patient compliance for users of peer-to-peer online health communities: cross-sectional study

Audrain-Pontevia Anne-Françoise, Menvielle Loick et Ertz Myriam. (2019). Effects of three antecedents of patient compliance for users of peer-to-peer online health communities: cross-sectional study. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 21, (11), e14006.

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URL officielle: https://doi.org/10.2196/14006

Résumé

Background: Over the past 50 years, patient noncompliance has appeared as a major public health concern and focus of a great deal of research because it endangers patient recovery and imposes a considerable financial burden on health care systems. Meanwhile, online health communities (OHCs) are becoming more common and are commonly used by individuals with health problems, and they may have a role in facilitating compliance. Despite this growing popularity, little is known about patient compliance predictors for OHCs’ users.

Objective: This study aimed to investigate the extent to which participating in OHCs may trigger higher levels of compliance. It identified 3 interrelated predictors that may affect patient compliance: patient empowerment gained through peer-to-peer OHCs, satisfaction with the physician, and commitment to the physician.

Methods: A Web-based survey tested the conceptual model and assessed the effects of patient empowerment gained through OHCs on patient satisfaction and commitment to the physician, as well as the effects of these 3 predictors on patient compliance with the proposed treatment. Members of peer-to-peer OHCs were asked to answer an online questionnaire. A convenience sample of 420 patients experiencing chronic illness and using peer-to-peer OHCs was surveyed in August 2018 in Québec, Canada. A path analysis using structural equation modeling tested the proposed relationships between the predictors and their respective paths on patient compliance. The mediation effects of these predictor variables on patient compliance were estimated with the PROCESS macro in SPSS.

Results: The findings indicated that patient empowerment gained through OHCs was positively related to patient commitment to the physician (beta=.69; P<.001) and patient compliance with the proposed treatment (beta=.35; P<.001). Patient commitment also positively influenced patient compliance (beta=.74; P<.001). Patient empowerment did not exert a significant influence on patient satisfaction with the physician (beta=.02; P=.76), and satisfaction did not affect compliance (beta=−.07; P=.05); however, patient satisfaction was positively related to patient commitment to the physician (beta=.14; P<.01). The impact of empowerment on compliance was partially mediated by commitment to the physician (beta=.32; 95% CI 0.22-0.44) but not by satisfaction.

Conclusions: This study highlights the importance of peer-to-peer OHCs for two main reasons. The primary reason is that patient empowerment gained through peer-to-peer OHCs both directly and indirectly enhances patient compliance with the proposed treatment. The underlying mechanisms of these effects were shown. Second, commitment to the physician was found to play a more critical role than satisfaction with the physician in determining patient-physician relationship quality. Overall, our findings support the assumption that health care stakeholders should encourage the use of peer-to-peer OHCs to favor patient empowerment and patient commitment to the physician to increase patient compliance with the proposed treatment.

Type de document:Article publié dans une revue avec comité d'évaluation
Volume:21
Numéro:11
Pages:e14006
Version évaluée par les pairs:Oui
Date:2019
Sujets:Sciences sociales et humaines > Sciences de la gestion > Marketing
Sciences de la santé > Sciences médicales
Sciences de la santé > Sciences médicales > Administration de la santé
Département, module, service et unité de recherche:Départements et modules > Département des sciences économiques et administratives
Mots-clés:online social networking, patient empowerment, patient compliance, patient satisfaction, structural equation modeling
Déposé le:19 nov. 2019 23:42
Dernière modification:19 nov. 2019 23:42
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