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Impact of hypoventilation training on muscle oxygenation, myoelectrical changes, systemic [K+], and repeated-sprint ability in basketball players

Lapointe Julien, Paradis-Deschênes Pénélope, Woorons Xavier, Lemaître Frédéric et Billaut François. (2020). Impact of hypoventilation training on muscle oxygenation, myoelectrical changes, systemic [K+], and repeated-sprint ability in basketball players. Frontiers in Sports and Active Living,

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URL officielle: http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.3389/fspor.2020.00029

Résumé

This study investigated the impact of repeated-sprint (RS) training with voluntary hypoventilation at low lung volume (VHL) on RS ability (RSA) and on performance in a 30-15 intermittent fitness test (30-15IFT). Over 4 weeks, 17 basketball players included eight sessions of straight-line running RS and RS with changes of direction into their usual training, performed either with normal breathing (CTL, n = 8) or with VHL (n = 9). Before and after the training, athletes completed a RSA test (12 × 30-m, 25-s rest) and a 30-15IFT. During the RSA test, the fastest sprint (RSAbest), time-based percentage decrement score (RSASdec), total electromyographic intensity (RMS), and spectrum frequency (MPF) of the biceps femoris and gastrocnemius muscles, and biceps femoris NIRS-derived oxygenation were assessed for every sprint. A capillary blood sample was also taken after the last sprint to analyse metabolic and ionic markers. Cohen's effect sizes (ES) were used to compare group differences. Compared with CTL, VHL did not clearly modify RSAbest, but likely lowered RSASdec (VHL: −24.5% vs. CTL: −5.9%, group difference: −19.8%, ES −0.44). VHL also lowered the maximal deoxygenation induced by sprints ([HHb]max; group difference: −2.9%, ES −0.72) and enhanced the reoxygenation during recovery periods ([HHb]min; group difference: −3.6%, ES −1.00). VHL increased RMS (group difference: 18.2%, ES 1.28) and maintained MPF toward higher frequencies (group difference: 9.8 ± 5.0%, ES 1.40). These changes were concomitant with a lower potassium (K+) concentration (group difference: −17.5%, ES −0.67), and the lowering in [K+] was largely correlated with RSASdec post-training in VHL only (r = 0.66, p < 0.05). However, VHL did not clearly alter PO2, hemoglobin, lactate and bicarbonate concentration and base excess. There was no difference between group velocity gains for the 30-15IFT (CTL: 6.9% vs. VHL: 7.5%, ES 0.07). These results indicate that RS training combined with VHL may improve RSA, which could be relevant to basketball player success. This gain may be attributed to greater muscle reoxygenation, enhanced muscle recruitment strategies, and improved K+ regulation to attenuate the development of muscle fatigue, especially in type-II muscle fibers.

Type de document:Article publié dans une revue avec comité d'évaluation
Version évaluée par les pairs:Oui
Date:Avril 2020
Sujets:Sciences de la santé
Sciences de la santé > Sciences de l'activité physique et réadaptation
Sciences de la santé > Sciences de l'activité physique et réadaptation > Kinésiologie
Département, module, service et unité de recherche:Départements et modules > Département des sciences de la santé > Programmes d'études en kinésiologie
Mots-clés:Repeated-sprint ability, breath-hold, hypoxia, hypoventilation, muscle oxygenation, muscle recruitment, potassium, capacité de sprint répété, apnée, hypoxie, hypoventilation, oxygénation musculaire, recrutement musculaire, potassium
Déposé le:07 févr. 2022 20:34
Dernière modification:07 févr. 2022 20:34
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